Yes. My whip really is that cool.

My car has wi-fi. That’s right suckas, I’m a rolling hot spot. Cuddle up on the Interstate and take a little suckle if you like. It’s on me and Mark Miller Subaru. Interested in a little coolness of your own? Check out a new Subaru Outback for yourself. They are the bees knees. and then some.

And yes, this is shameless sponsor promo. Long live the interwebz.

ABP Black Friday Sales 2011

This is the first of several sales we’ll be posting throughout the day!

These are matted 12″x 18″ signed/limited edition prints. Paper is Epson Ultra Premium Matte. Prints ship in protective plastic sleeves and are frame-ready. Single white archival mat. Outer dimensions are 16″ x 22″.

Save more than 50%! MSRP is $175.00. Black Friday sale price is $80.00 (plus shipping). See below for prints selections. Quantities are extremely limited and will go quickly! Email adam@adambarkerphotography.com or call 801-550-9141 to order.

Thankful

Barker Boys

For:

family

friends

A comfortable home

Heat

f2.8

baldness (reverse psychology)

snow

water

diversity

faith

sunrise

tolerance

support

love

contacts (I can see!)

nature

wilderness

expression

salt lake city

sons

wifey

gore-tex

drive

priority boarding

season passes

loyalty

income

Feel free to add to the list.

Oh–and Happy Thanksgiving.

The What/When/Why/How: Question 4

Osguthorpe Barn in Early Winter, Park City, UT

I recently answered several interview questions for a photography student and one of their projects. Thought it might interest some of you readers out there. I’ll post several of these questions/answers in coming weeks. See previous interview questions here and here.

How do you see the market changing, in the past 5 years, as well as the upcoming 10 years?

This is a tough question to answer. I began my career in the digital era. I learned how to shoot on film, but really, the entirety of my experience as a business person in the photo industry has been in this digital era. I wasn’t around for the “golden days” of the photography industry where $30K creative fees weren’t uncommon for deep pocketed commercial clients and five-star imagery wasn’t a green box auto-mode click away.

It’s tough to predict what will occur in the next 10 years, but as we’ve already seen, I think multi-media will continue to play a larger role in making a living as a professional photographer. Competition will likely continue to increase, but an understanding of how to consistently product exceptional, unique imagery and how to do this in a way that is both attractive and affordable to clients will remain key.

As much as things change (and they certainly will continue to evolve in this industry), many things do stay the same. The small things will continue to make a big difference. Things like timely email/phone/image request response, personal outreach to existing and potential clients, timely updates on one’s latest and greatest work and an upbeat and likeable disposition will still be the one last pebble that tips the scales in your direction when it comes down to you and the next guy with equally appealing imagery.

One thing is always for sure with this industry—if you’re not moving forward, you are moving backwards. There is no neutral. You must be aware of what’s going, and you must adapt. There are so many photographers that have said this industry is dead, and that it will become harder and harder to make a living as a photographer. I disagree with this entirely. It may or may not become more difficult, but more than anything else, it will become different. Like I said, adapt, or fail.

Shalom!

"A" for effort, no?

From Jerusalem!

After a hefty number of hours in the air, I touched down in Tel Aviv to find a pleasant man named Michel waiting to take me to Jerusalem. I’ve been here less than 5 hrs, and can already feel the fantastic vibe of a city steeped in history. I managed a very quick and impromptu dusk session from the hotel balcony, and I’ll be spending the next several days in the Jordan desert with the crew from Manfrotto/Kata Backpacks. Can’t wait to share some imagery from this unique part of the world!

East Jerusalem at Dusk

Snippet: AdamBarkerPhotography/Telluride Photo Festival 2011


Here’s a quick look inside (well, really, outside!) my workshop at the 2011 Telluride Photo Festival. As always, many thanks to my sponsors Mark Miller Subaru, Arc’teryx, Mountain Khakis, Singh Ray Filters, Manfrotto School of Xcellence and Clikelite Backpacks. Many thanks to my assistant Nate Sorensen for putting the video together!

The What/When/Why/How: Questions 2/3

I recently answered several interview questions for a photography student and one of their projects. Thought it might interest some of you readers out there. I’ll post several of these questions/answers in coming weeks. See question #1 here.

2. How long did it take before you were able to fully support yourself through photography? What did you do in the meantime?

    I studied PR in college, and worked in PR capacities in the ski industry for about five years after college. During that time, I established my photography business. I obtained a business license and began learning the business side of photography. I worked on my photography business every second I wasn’t working on my PR job. I traveled for my day job to major cities like San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Vancouver and elsewhere. I took my camera with me everywhere—woke up early and stayed out late shooting, while my PR appointments and duties took up the working day hours.

    I had my “side business” for about two to three years before finally taking the leap and committing to photography full time for my living. It’s been just under three years, and it’s the best decision I’ve ever made. I love waking up and knowing there’s no limit to what I might accomplish on any given day. It comes with its pitfalls as well, but there’s nothing better than working for yourself.

    3. How much time to you spend on marketing and promotion versus shooting?

    This really depends on the week/season, but generally, it’s probably 65/35 (marketing/shooting). I’ve always said the hardest part of running a photography business is, in fact, running a photography business. This requires an understanding of when to shoot, and when to sit in your chair and get on the email, social media, phone calls, self promo and everything else that contributes to a successful business. Some photographers kid themselves into thinking that a skilled trigger finger will be their golden ticket to success. Shooting A+ images might make you a skilled photographer, but it won’t necessarily make you a successful business person.