Pictureline Presentation Aug. 23

I’m very pleased to announce a special evening at my favorite camera store, Pictureline–coming up in late August. I’ll be discussing one of the biggest challenges we face as photographers–creative composition. Check the link below for details and to sign up for the seminar. My last two presentations at Pictureline have filled up quickly. Get your seat now!

http://www.pictureline.com/events/conquer-composition-adam-barker-seminar.html

Quick Tips for Underwater Fish Photography

Underwater image of brown trout and fly fisherman with net by AdamBarkerPhotography.

Good times on the water yesterday. Once again, I can’t bring myself to pass up an opportunity to shoot some imagery underwater.

For the most part, the fish were somewhat uncooperative yesterday (can’t really blame em’!), but this healthy brown trout posed for the camera for nearly a minute after its release. This lighting conditions and exclusion of most of the angler lend a mysterious quality to this image. It begs the viewer to study it for a moment. Upon further inspection, it all comes together–fly fishing, small creek, catch & release, nostalgic moment, etc.

There certainly is a learning curve to shooting UW photographs. It’s taken me some time to dial in my methods, and I finally feel like I have a routine under the water, just as I do above the water. Two of the key steps in my UW approach:

1. Shoot in manual mode and pre-adjust your exposure before shooting. Most of the time, I point my camera down in the water and set my exposure for the UW light reading. If I’m shooting half in/half out shots, I may underexpose for UW by 1/2 to a full stop in order to maintain detail above water as well. If lighting conditions are just right, the two environments will actually balance quite well in terms of dynamic range.

2. Utilize your camera auto AF selection mode. This is a big one. One of the hardest parts of UW photography (without looking through the viewfinder or at the liveview display) is ensuring proper focus on the parts of the image that you want to be sharp. I’ve found the easiest way to do this is to let your camera select the focus zones, as opposed to pre-selecting a focus zone and trying to place the fish (or more precisely, the fish’s eye) in the perfect spot. This is literally the only time I ever use this function on my camera, as I generally want to have say over what the camera focuses on.

If you happen to venture into UW photography, the above tips should be useful. Most importantly, shoot a lot of images–the throw-away to keeper ratio is significant…